Administering Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Transduced With a Murine T-Cell Receptor Recognizing the G12V Variant of Mutated RAS in HLA-A*1101 Patients


Original post, click here

Background:

A new cancer therapy involves taking white blood cells from a person, growing them in the lab, genetically modifying them, then giving them back to the person. This therapy is called gene transfer using anti-KRAS G12V mTCR cells.

Objective:

To see if anti-KRAS G12 V mTCR cells are safe and can shrink tumors.

Eligibility:

Adults at least 18 years old with cancer that has the KRAS G12V molecule on the surface of tumors.

Design:

In another protocol, participants will:

Be screened

Have cells harvested and grown

Have leukapheresis

In this protocol, participants will have the procedures below.

Participants will be admitted to the hospital.

Over 5 days, participants will get 2 chemotherapy medicines as an infusion via catheter in the upper chest.

A few days later, participants will get the anti-KRAS G12V mTCR cells via catheter.

For up to 3 days, participants will get a drug to make the cells active.

A day after getting the cells, participants will get a drug to increase their white blood cell count. This will be a shot or injection under the skin.

Participants will recover in the hospital for 1 2 weeks. They will have lab and blood tests.

Participants will take an antibiotic for at least 6 months.

Participants will have visits every few months for 2 years, and then as determined by their doctor.

Visits will be 1 2 days. They will include lab tests, imaging studies, and physical exam. Some visits may include leukapheresis or blood drawn.

Participants will have blood collected over several years.